What are the top 20 beneficial bacteria for your gut?

May 19, 2023 3 min read

What are the top 20 beneficial bacteria for your gut?

There is no definitive list of the top 20 beneficial bacterial species for the gut, as the composition of the gut microbiome can vary widely between individuals. However, there are several bacterial species that are commonly found in a healthy gut microbiome and have been associated with various health benefits. Here are 20 examples:

  1. Lactobacillus acidophilus: Helps break down lactose, produces lactic acid, and supports a healthy immune system.
  2. Lactobacillus casei: Helps improve digestion, supports a healthy immune system, and may help reduce inflammation.
  3. Bifidobacterium bifidum: Helps break down complex carbohydrates, supports a healthy immune system, and may help reduce inflammation.
  4. Bifidobacterium lactis: Helps improve digestion, supports a healthy immune system, and may help reduce inflammation.
  5. Lactobacillus plantarum: Helps improve digestion, produces lactic acid, and may help reduce inflammation.
  6. Lactobacillus rhamnosus: Helps improve digestion, supports a healthy immune system, and may help reduce inflammation.
  7. Bifidobacterium breve: Helps improve digestion, supports a healthy immune system, and may help reduce inflammation.
  8. Streptococcus thermophilus: Helps break down lactose and supports a healthy immune system.
  9. Lactococcus lactis: Helps break down lactose and produces lactic acid.
  10. Bacteroides fragilis: Helps regulate the immune system and may help reduce inflammation.
  11. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii: Helps regulate the immune system and may help reduce inflammation.
  12. Akkermansia muciniphila: Helps maintain the integrity of the gut lining and may help reduce inflammation.
  13. Roseburia spp.: Helps break down complex carbohydrates and may help reduce inflammation.
  14. Eubacterium rectale: Helps break down complex carbohydrates and may help reduce inflammation.
  15. Clostridium butyricum: Helps produce butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid that supports gut health.
  16. Enterococcus faecium: Helps support a healthy immune system.
  17. Streptococcus salivarius: Helps break down carbohydrates and supports a healthy immune system.
  18. Escherichia coli: Helps produce vitamin K and supports a healthy immune system.
  19. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron: Helps break down complex carbohydrates and supports a healthy immune system.
  20. Prevotella spp.: Helps break down complex carbohydrates and supports a healthy immune system.

It is important to note that the beneficial bacteria in the gut can vary widely between individuals, and not all strains of the above-listed species may be beneficial for everyone. Some bacteria in the list might be regarded as pathogens or bad bugs in some research. However, research in this field is ongoing, and our understanding of the specific roles of each bacterial strain in gut health is still evolving.

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References:

  1. Belkaid Y, Hand TW. Role of the microbiota in immunity and inflammation. Cell. 2014;157(1):121-141. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2014.03.011
  2. Hill C, Guarner F, Reid G, et al. Expert consensus document. The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics consensus statement on the scope and appropriate use of the term probiotic. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014;11(8):506-514. doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2014.66
  3. Rinninella E, Cintoni M, Raoul P, et al. Food components and dietary habits: keys for a healthy gut microbiota composition. Nutrients. 2019;11(10):2393. doi:10.3390/nu11102393
  4. Sender R, Fuchs S, Milo R. Revised estimates for the number of human and bacteria cells in the body. PLoS Biol. 2016;14(8):e1002533. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1002533
  5. Hill C, Guarner F, Reid G, et al. The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics consensus statement on the scope and appropriate use of the term probiotic. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014;11(8):506-514. doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2014.66
  6. Arumugam M, Raes J, Pelletier E, et al. Enterotypes of the human gut microbiome. Nature. 2011;473(7346):174-180. doi:10.1038/nature09944
  7. Round JL, Mazmanian SK. The gut microbiota shapes intestinal immune responses during health and disease. Nat Rev Immunol. 2009;9(5):313-323. doi:10.1038/nri2515
  8. Bäckhed F, Ley RE, Sonnenburg JL, Peterson DA, Gordon JI. Host-bacterial mutualism in the human intestine. Science. 2005;307(5717):1915-1920. doi:10.1126/science.1104816
  9. Fischbach MA, Sonnenburg JL. Eating for two: how metabolism establishes interspecies interactions in the gut. Cell Host Microbe. 2011;10(4):336-347. doi:10.1016/j.chom.2011.10.002
  10. Round JL, Mazmanian SK. Inducible Foxp3+ regulatory T-cell development by a commensal bacterium of the intestinal microbiota. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010;107(27):12204-12209. doi:10.1073/pnas.0909122107
  11. Macpherson AJ, Harris NL. Interactions between commensal intestinal bacteria and the immune system. Nat Rev Immunol. 2004;4(6):478-485. doi:10.1038/nri1373
  12. Hsiao EY, McBride SW, Hsien S, et al. Microbiota modulate behavioral and physiological abnormalities associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Cell. 2013;155(7):1451-1463. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2013.11


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